Space and marketing!

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I just found out that Wally Schirra (Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronaut) did some peddling for HP in this HP-01 (of all calculators!) magazine ad.

Pretty nice ad:

HP-01

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Another recent find on eBay

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Here’s a current auction on eBay (link while it lasts: http://www.ebay.com/itm/251218991245?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649).

Pictures and description:

Here is the second of a couple, obviously lightly used, NASA surplus scientific calculators along with its very clean carry case, HP 82041 charger and various user manuals. The user personal ID number is inscribed on title page of user guide, has property tag (permanently?) attached to case bottom and the inventory date tags are remaining.  The keyboard and case are in remarkably fine condition with few visible signs of use and the display is crisp and bright.  The NiCad batteries were dead and had to be replaced with new.   The original battery pack was carefully split along the seam to retain the original appearance. If properly maintained this rebuilt battery should provide years of continued service.  There is an HP serial number on case back – “1601A14183” and ID # of 721 on the title page of user guide.  Thanks for your interest and good luck bidding.

HP-25

HP-25

HP-25

HP-25

HP-25

Aristo 80123: the slide rule to have

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A slide rule designed by Aristo, a slide rule manufacturer, especially for Glenn L. Martin Company‘s engineers. This particular model was designed for calculations related to space travel and rocket engineering.

Some additional details about this model on this webpage.

Aristo 80123 Front

Aristo 80123 front

Aristo 80123 back

Aristo 80123 back

Aristo 80123 gutter view

Aristo 80123 gutter view

Circumstancial evidence II

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The detective work continues. Another blog comment:

I seem to recall that grooving the pavement on highways, for better traction, was an outgrowth of some of NASA’s research – on runways, which is possibly outside of Charlie’s parameters.

My father did the stress analysis of the cargo-bay arm on the shuttle launch pad with a hand-held calculator (HP-45) and pencil and paper (the younger engineers didn’t know where to start with it). That was in the 1970s (he retired in 1979). The company my sister works for did the aspherical glassware for the Hubble fix on computer-controlled equipment, in 1992 or 1993. That’s a big change right there.

HP-45

HP-45

Canadarm

Canadarm

Another unknown calculator

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This time in Mission Control. You can briefly see the calculator at 6:28 in this Youtube video about the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project:

HP-25C

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Here’s another blog comment of a former NASA engineer I found while roaming for tidbits:

While I was working at NASA-JPL during the summer of 1974, I purchased a HP-25C calculator. It was such a big deal that I was able to get one of my buddies there to engrave my name in the plastic housing to show that it was my personal property, not NASA’s. I purchased a number of scientific calculators since 1974. I keep a spare scientific calculator in my luggage now. It cost me $3.00 on sale.

HP-25C

HP-25C

Korolyov and Von Braun

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Caption for Korolyov’s slide rule

The “magician’s wand”

Sergei Korolyov used this german-made slide rule to make quick calculations. To his colleagues, Korolyov’s slide rule was a “magician’s wand.” Today’s engineers and scientists use pocket calculators for this purpose.

Manufacturer: Albert Nestler A.G.”, Germany

Korolyovs slide rule

Korolyov's slide rule

Caption for Von Braun’s slide rule

An engineer’s tool

While a manager and public figure, Wernher von Braun stayed close to the work of engineering and design, using this slide rule for calculations.

Manufacturer: Albert Nestler A.G., Germany

Von Brauns slide rule

Von Braun's slide rule

According to Wikipedia article on slide rules:

German rocket scientist Wernher von Braun brought two 1930s vintage Nestler slide rules with him when he moved to the U.S. after World War II to work on the American space program. Throughout his life he never used any other pocket calculating devices; slide rules served him perfectly well for making quick estimates of rocket design parameters and other figures.

I find it an odd twist of fate that these two towering engineers used the same slide rule model.

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