Broken NASA link about HP-48 and HP-75

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Information from a forum posting at hpmuseum.org:

Have a look at Nasa material listings, including HP-48 and HP-75 keyboard overlays.

Not usefull reading, but interesting anyway…

http://map3.msfc.nasa.gov/mapweb/tr/tr1_manf_862_1.html

Onboard shuttle computer equivalent in computer power to HP-48SX

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So says this article:

Intel Coppermines won’t go in rockets… phew
But x86 technology does soar to the skies

By Mike Magee

Posted in Business, 16th December 1999 13:13 GMT

A source at a US defence firm has written us to re-assure the people of the world that they need not fear that missiles will use the elusive Coppermine microprocessor. That follows reports that we carried about an erratumnotbug found in some batches of the CuMine chip. The reader, who wishes to remain anonymous for entirely understandable reasons, said there is “absolutely zero chance” that Coppermines would get used in the control circuitry of missiles. According to him, any chip used in the critical control path of a missile, space probe or aircraft has to be proved to be worthy and produced in ceramic packaging. The processors may not also use fans. But according to the source, Intel does produce 8086 to 386 chips for the military and has to guarantee 25 years support for these parts. Embedded applications use clocked down surface mounted mobile parts. And here’s a really fun and interesting part of this tale. The Space Shuttle has an onboard computer with the power of a 48SX HP calculator, and the astronauts take on board an HP 48SX pre-programmed with the Shuttle’s flight plan, in case of navigation failures with the onboard computer. This HP model has a serial port and 64K of memory…

HP-48SX

HP-48SX

Another 48 in space

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Scene description from the Johnson Space Center digital image collection (mission STS-052; 1992):

Candid view of crewmembers Lacy Veach and James Wetherbee in the aft flight deck. Veach is holding a scientific calculator and Wetherbee is holding a prehistoric adze cutting tool.

HP-48, model unknown

HP-48, model unknown

HP-48 series and the Space Shuttle Program

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This is the only reference I found so far about the presence of the HP-48 series in shuttle flights:

and that, children, is why they take up a pile of HP handheld calculators with them. Used to be the HP41C/CV/CX series, today it’s the HP48SX/GX series. Without going into extended/expanded memory, the older 48SX can hold 288 K of memory. With extended/expanded memory, the new 48GX can hold over 1 M of memory.

Discovery shuttle launch

Discovery shuttle launch

HP-48, possibly a GX

HP-48, possibly a GX, aboard STS-107, Columbia's last mission

HP-48GX

HP-48GX